Author Topic: GRAW Map Making for Dummies  (Read 8744 times)

Fishmonger

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Re: GRAW Map Making for Dummies
« Reply #45 on: February 12, 2018, 02:23:18 PM »
some basic information about creating maps from scratch.

I've just spent 5 days building a new city landscape from scratch and have probably found a pretty good approach in terms of what to do when, plus with Jake's help, I finally figured out how to move static objects up and down... it was one of those duh-moments, but hey, it will bring you sewers under the streets :arrow:
 
The map was supposed to be a city with some bombing damage similar to mission 12 map in the single player campaign.
 
I chose City as the texture base set and started with the black void only inhabited by our dummy soldier.
 
The key choice to make at that point was what to place first? Streets? Buildings? alternate? I chose buildings, leaving good sized gaps for roads where I felt like running some sort of road. You have to have a sense for how much space you will need for the road and sidewalk, plus it helps to have a rough idea about what the city should look like (where are the tall buildings, the lower ones, park, etc). I also made sure I worked somewhat into both directions from the dummy soldier starting point, as that will make it easier at the end to create the zone that will be shown in the minimap. IF you keep it square and just grow equally in all directions, you will only have to increase one digit in each value in zones.xml. I didn't quite get it that nicely, plus my area is more rectangular, yet it was still the easiest map so far to adjust my red box for the minimap zone shot.
 
Placing objects - F1 gives you basic help in the editor and tells you most things. Right button places object. If there's an obstruction, it won't unless you keep the button pressed for 2 seconds and "force" the static object to be placed. Don't overlap textures, but in some cases you have to do this for things like the highway overpass, which will work fine, but then the editor won't want to put roads or grass under it. Right click nice and long and it will do it!
 
To rotate the object, you need to click the mouse wheel button - each click rotates a static 90 degrees counter clockwise. Delete key comes in handy after each incorrect placement, then rotate again and drop the object with the right button until you get it to line up properly.
 
Some maps need you to place buildings, roads and walls at various altitudes. The maps that use custom terrain and the historic city static set, as well as sewers require that you move the plane up or down. The cursor/arrow keys on your keyboard do that! Each click is up or down 5 meters. There is no in-between option.
 
some static objects in the editor have alternate versions - see the possible pulldown menu on the bottom left of your screen. some buildings have normal and damaged versions, others come with alternate textures or slight 3D changes to make them look unique. That enlarges the number of unique looking objects quite a bit and allows you to build more realistic maps.
 
when you're done with roads and buildings, it's time to put "props" on the map. Those are things like garbage cans, light poles, traffic lights, walls, fences, trees, flower beds, bushes, etc - There's a LOT of stuff here to do. To save time, I usually pick one group of props or a single one and go all over the map to place it where I want it to occur, rather than to work on one corner of the map at a time, swapping props in the editor for each small area to complete them. You may want to do this at first, especially to learn what all these props on your list are, as the naming is not necessarily intuitive. You won't find a "tree" anywhere under the letter T - you need to look for flowerbed_tree or shanty_tree or street_tree or palm_tree... many other objects are named even less descriptive.
 
The biggest thing about placing props is to get them to snap to surfaces and not to overlap things like fences. You get the proper elevation with the "N" key - it changes the placement mode to "planar" and trees suddenly won't float in mid air, etc. However, sometimes you may want to place something at an odd elevation, for example in order to rotate it to lay it on it's side without half-burying it in the ground. Then you use the normal mode (toggle with N key again to turn off planar mode). To change that insertion elevation (the little green sphere tells you where it's gonna go) use the PageUp and PageDown keys. Tedious, but you don't use that mode very often. Just place and check, delete if not where you want it. I used this trick to get some fuel tanks below the map surface so that my C4 explosions are bigger and better than normal...
 
I reserve military type props for later in the build process, as I don't really have a clue where to set up a 50 cal until I get into the AI process. Sandbags are one of those things, but since you need them on the map for rendering the light maps properly, you gotta decide before you render where to place those. On my most recent map I forgot about sandbags and rendered 22 hours to get the map done - now I'd have to do this again to add sand bags. Guess I'll just add ammo crates for cover on the .50s instead, as those don't need light maps rendered (those are the little tricks you learn after you've made a dozen maps)
 
Once you feel like most of your props are in place, you can start loading up the roads with vehicles. You find those on the "Dynamic" menu. The vehicles that can actually move in the game are something I place with the AI later in the process.  Right click on map and click again to drop the thing once you hovered it and rotated it (cursor keys) to the position you want to place it.
 
Sound is another important element - place those once the landscape is pretty much all set. There are a few cues you need to know and type into the "cue" field correctly when placing them: birds, crickets, foliage, frogs, etc - I don't have a complete list, but if somebody wants it I can post those I know).
 
Sky environment - think day or night map, then pick a sky and memorize the mission it came from, since on map export, you should match the sky with the "cube" for the light source of that arrangement.
 
AI graph - gotta put that on the map. Wait until you are certain you will not change any props or even statics, because you'll end up with a bad graph. Make the world work first, render the lightmaps and walk around in the map before you begin wiht the AI stuff. Remember your vehicle AI graph has to be a single graph - cannot be broken into more than one connected network! If you place a barrier on a road that has an AI graph on it, it will break it in most cases, so do the barriers before you do AI graphs. You may change your mind about some barriers once you realize they seriously reduce your vehicle range on most maps.
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Fishmonger

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Re: GRAW Map Making for Dummies
« Reply #46 on: February 12, 2018, 02:24:09 PM »
I think I'll keep adding things here like in a blog as I learn new stuff. some items I ran into on the Fishtrap map over the last few days:
 
Sewers - if you want sewers under your city, build the sewers first, then put streets, sidewalks and grass over those areas to make sure no surface buildings are above the sewers. At least in the city set of objects, most buildings have a real "basement" that extends deep below the zero height surface and then blocks the sewers with black walls. I wasted a lot of time on these sewers adding them after the buildings, which in itself was already pretty darn difficult.  Don't repeat the same mistake.
 
Props brush - I finally figured out the file that stores the graffiti and garbage, antennas and other small items you paint on the landscape with the props brush: it's the "massunit.bin"file and can't be edited in a text editor if you want to make changes, however, if you were to take a map like mission08 and mod it to something like Dinner_out and you want to avoid graffiti to float in mid-air, you can just swap a blank massunit.bin into the editor directory of your project and use that instead of the one that came with the mission. Then add your own stuff. It is a lot of work to redo graffiti and garbage, but you will avoid crazy stuff like an antenna floating 5 feet above the roof of a guard tower, etc...
 
Map crashes on load? search the world.xml for objects at altitudes of less than "-5000"
 
I had some barrels fall off my map and land at -50,000.8-something  and apparently that was a problem once the map grew in size.
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Fishmonger

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Re: GRAW Map Making for Dummies
« Reply #47 on: February 12, 2018, 02:25:26 PM »
ok - got something else to add that is important only for those who make custom maps or modify objects on existing maps that force rendering new light maps. There's a RAM limitation I have run into before with Dinner_Out and other maps, which was the original reason for figuring out how to recycle existing maps using the bundler tool. However, right now I am working on a big custom landscape and here's what I found out this week that may affect one of your bigger projects:
 
what I did to render The_Last_Castle map:
 
I prepared the world file for minimal RAM load - absolutely nothing but static layer, props (small-static), electrical (no wiring), and sky environment. I have not tried to remove the sound but I doubt that that is a lot of RAM saved.  (you do that all in a text editor - copy a backup file somewhere, then go in and delete all but the stuff you must have in there to get light maps to render - saves RAM!)
 
then I started the editor in 800x600, low qual, trilinear filtering, low off off - whatever the lowest settings are, in windowed mode. I then QUIT the editor to restart it with those settings before even loading the map (Again, all this saves RAM). Restarted the editor, loaded the map and went to export lightmaps - kablammo - out of Memory!
 
Now that's usually where you throw in your towel and go to lower quality lightmaps. However, I am stubborn. Started up the editor, tabbed out to get the task manager up and check the process list to see RAM use, max ram use and VM use (gotta add those columns to the display). Tabbed back into the editor, loaded the map while looking at the taskmanager counting up and up towards the infamous 1GB barrier. So the second time around, it loads the map and I am at about 500MB RAM used and 500MB in virtual memory. That's when I went to the export and tried it one more time with medium settings... and wouldn't you know it - this time it went to about 975MB RAM used, about 990MB virtual memory and it started to render (you know you're good to go when you see 0% done....)
 
So the second time around when I had to change something on the map last night, I did the same procedure, because yet again, it crashed on the first render attempt, even though the map was SMALLER than the one that worked the night before. I had removed about 25 props, added 2 instead, both real small. Everything else the same, so I knew that the computer could render it. I went back to restarted it just like the day before, had my task manager up and again, second try, it did begin to render the map!
 
Moral of the story - don't give up after your first render attempt - do it twice. WHY that is, I do not know, as each time I am completely restarting the editor. Perhaps Windows needs to dump stuff from the virtual memory and the second time by it has done so and things work. Whatever it is, keep that in mind for rendering lightmaps on bigger maps.
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Fishmonger

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Re: GRAW Map Making for Dummies
« Reply #48 on: February 12, 2018, 02:27:01 PM »
Some new things I learned/discovered when working on The_Last_Castle and that make things much easier in the editor.
 
The thumb button on the mouse is worth its weight in gold! placed props and don't like where they are? Don't worry - just click that button on the mouse and drag that piece to where you want it (depending on grid settings obviously). I must confess I never used that button before and each object alsways had to be placed perfectly. Now it's a breeze to make sure things sit where I want them.
 
Also - the AI graph is one of those things where you want the nodes as far apart as possible but still connected with those green arms ('cause that saves RAM and the AI doesn't need extra nodes, just those that allow them to move around). Especially doing AI graphs up and down stairs was a pain before. Now I can drag those nodes around until those green connectors pop up to give me the ideal location. Endless hours of time saved! Actually, in the past I never put them on buildings unless I really needed that. Now, on the new map, AI goes anywhere you can go - up stairs, on roofs, etc
 
Need a building that doesn't exist? That's where I took a lesson from the Hocaga Beach map, where the map maker built all kinds of stairs and walls out of concrete blocks (the "ind_fence_base" and "-ind_fence_base_long" pieces used for the base of those bridge fences you see at the spawn of Cheeseburger Hill for example). Those are pretty darn nice "Lego blocks" to put together concrete walls. I put a few fortifications together using these things.
 
Need a staircase where there is none? "ind_small_stairs" is a nice little ramp that can be used to build  narrow custom staircase. I used this to get AI and ghosts up and down from some large fortress walls, wrapping this staircase in some walls so you can't see that they are actually floating in mid-air and don't have supports all the way to the floor. Works fine once you get good at placing things in 3D space without the planar function.
 
How do you place things in space where they don't snap on to something already there? Turn off the planar snap (N key) and then select an object of known elevation. Then use page up/down to move your  insertion sphere thingie to the height you want. Then place it, make sure your horizontal grid is where you need to (I usually only use 25 or 1) so you can then use the right mouse button to drag it to where you need it, and don't forget the mouse wheel clicking to rotate 90 degrees each click, arrow keys left/right to rotate freely.
 
I will post some screens of some custom structures once the map is released (don't want to spoil the fun before that first mission...)
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Fishmonger

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Re: GRAW Map Making for Dummies
« Reply #49 on: February 12, 2018, 02:29:06 PM »
ok, so now that we all have at least heard about the sewers on Last Castle, here's how I did it:
 

 
since there are no ramps in sewers, I had to create several levels to drop the route low enough to stay below ground when finally heading west from the Castle Hill towards the exit. To do do that, I stacked the sewer entrance object to feed itself 5 times (I think that drops it 50 meters from the top).  The parts obviously aren't meant to mesh up with the door on the sewer level, but it was close enough, and I only needed to use some wall pieces to close the holes. This matters a lot on this map as there is no black basement below the horizon, but a bright yellowish light that would shine through any opening. This sky is the one that turns above-surface objects into a much more natural color, but it isn't dark below ground level.
 
The bunker at the end of the map (yeah, one day we'll get there...) is completely custom. The interior of it comes from the editor, but it was designed to mesh with the landscape of "Left_Behind" which you cannot use selectively - either all of it or nothing. That left me with a bunker you could look inside of like you can see inside of the buildings above in the picture of the sewers above. To close all those lids, I had to use concrete blocks meant for bridge railings and other pieces of the editor. Those things work almost like lego blocks and can get stuff built that you don't usually see on maps. The staircase in the mini fortress just west of the spawn location is a similar structure, built out of pieces meant for totally different things.
 
Doing these things only became possible for me once I realized how to toggle between planar and non-planar mode in placing and moving objects. When you know how to get something to a particular altitude in  3D space with the planar snap, you can then toggle it off and use the mouse thumb button to move it and place it exactly where it needs to go. Using grid for horizontal alignment gets all these things nicely stacked.  But realize that the time it takes to build a structure like my bunker is around 2 hours, while a normal building can be placed on the map in about 5 seconds, because it's already all done...
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Re: GRAW Map Making for Dummies
« Reply #50 on: February 12, 2018, 02:32:17 PM »
Quote from: WadCutter45;183199

1. When using the Mission or MP maps as a basis, removing any unneeded AI Graph nodes will save alot of export time and memory. Just look at the "world_xx.xml" file and you will notice the first section is <ai_graph name="main"> ... This section, along with <ai_graph name="vehicle">, are where those nodes are located on your bare map made by GRIN. Removing any of these that arent in your new, playable area will save time and memory while bundling and loading to play the map.

the problem here is to identify what part of the XML removes the AI graph where you don't need it. I simply remove the AI graph anyway, since GRIN maps are notoriously sloppy about this stuff. On the Longest_Kilometer base map I found a half dozen or more Vehicle Graph AI nodes hidden below static objects, unconnected to the part that was visible from above the world surface. Had to go below to delete - eventually just deleted it all and put it on properly myself. All other benefits of cutting down the AI graph are rather negligible
 
 
Quote from: WadCutter45;183199

2. I have removed all unneeded "static" items from the areas that can't be seen or accessed by players. Another time and memory saver. I also am guessing that it saves time while exporting too, as the engine won't have to build lighmaps for those items not in the map... ?? On my current project, the map from Mission 02, I am only utilizing 2/3 of the existing map, so I have removed all topical itmes ( <small_static name="first"> ) from my map. I will let you know if this turns out to not be the case.

I tried that once when I was rendering a new set of lightmaps for one of those large maps. It didn't like the idea of having any "holes" in the map - so if you remove static bulding objects, I recommend to close all the holes in the landscape with grass or sidewalk tiles, just to avoid a crash when rendering.
 
Quote from: WadCutter45;183199

3. This might be covered in the (F1) "Help" of the Editor. When placing AI (Human layer), the default order of "Guard" in the settings brings up a small blue circle (guard area of the AI) with a single directional blue line. I assume the blue directional line points the AI in the direction he is to guard.... To set this to a desired direction and radius, just hover the cursor on an area of the greatest distance he will look, and "click" the mouse wheel. To check this you can momentarily change the Order to "Sniper" where a large yellow cone and focus point shows up. Also, later if you decide to change an AI, going form "Sniper" to "Guard", or "Guard" to "Sniper" is just a click away. ;)

the blue circle with that line seems to aim the guys attention, but the actual dummy that is dropped on the map points his body - red line on the ground is right arm, green line looking forward.
 
One thing I have not tested but I think it does work is to change guard attention to "idle" by first making them patrol at moveguard_idle, and then changing orders back to guard. The regular guard order contains "moveguard_recon" in the xml, which is a much more attentive guy. I am getting tired of attentive AI shooting be before they can literally even see me. So as of lately, I am putting more of them on the map but make them less attentive with the idle type orders. Guards are usualy stupid anyway, but a little more can't hurt :)
 
 
 
Quote from: WadCutter45;183199

4. To allow your level's small Browser map (the Browser that shows before game start or upon death in-game) to show the nice "Base" and "Zulu" areas, just check the "always visible" box in the Multiplayer layer before you export your map. And don't leave any other layer's "always visible" box checked, as those items/lines will show in you mini-map. I usually export while in the "Player" layer.

 
don't follow you there - this switch seems to only leave the area stuff visible in the editor when you leave that layer. In game, those two zones are marked anyway on the minimap
 
Quote from: WadCutter45;183199

5. CLOSE YOUR TAGS. If you manually edit your .xml files, always look at these ending lines before you close your document. It's so easy to "copy and paste" a mistake and leave off some vital portion of the code. empty spaces between lines seem to have no effect on the engine, but improper lines will crash the editor/game.

xml 101 here
 
Quote from: WadCutter45;183199

6. While editing the world_xx.xml file, items in some sections can be shuffled or changed in order, while other sections have a definite "unit_id" number assigned to them. What this means is, sections <areas name="first"> and <human name="first"> (Areas and Human layers) can be grouped together to add or remove them from your map to save frame rates while placing items in the Editor. The "Area layer" does not drag down frame rates like the "Human layer", but areas can be removed if you want to focus on a new section of map after finishing a previous one. Just save a backup copy of the world file, remove the unwanted Area and Human layers, and open the editor to start on the next section with much better frame rates.

I usually edit no more than 2 spawn zones at a time before dumping all human XML into an external backup file. With my random maps, I'd be down to 5fps by the 4th trigger area. On my last small map, I think I had over 800 different AI orders. That runs at less than 1fps if loaded in the editor all at once.
 
Much of my editing happens in notepad and not in the game editor and once you get a feel for how to shuffle things in and out you can get pretty effective with those two tools
 
Quote from: WadCutter45;183199

7. When using the above method, I copy my Human layers into custom files, naming them HumanArea01.xml, HumanArea02.xml, and so on. This saves disc space, if that is an issue, and makes it easy to do a custom, play-testing map, using only the areas you want to build and test-play. Just realize you must edit the mission.xml file before you export this.

I call them "AI_area01.txt" or something like that
 
Quote from: WadCutter45;183199

8. If disc (hard drive) space is an issue, here is one I tripped on. To make way-points for the AI (Human layer) with "Patrol" orders, you press the "Insert" key to enable this action, left-mouse clicking to make a point, right-click to remove any points, and press "Insert" again to disable. By default, the in-game Screen shot key is the "Insert" key..... and it stores those pics as .tga format in the "...\Ubisoft\Ghost Recon Advanced Warfighter\Settings\profiles\graw_profile_yourname " folder. And that folder gets HUGE if you place alot of waypoints for AI in the Editor as the "Insert" works there just as it does in-game. I deleted 1.5 GBs of screen shots taken every time I used that key in the Editor... Doh! Start GRAW game, and change that default key in the Options. Mine is the "P" key now.

yeah, 4mb a pop - I clean that out frequently. Each map I do usually accumulates about 2GB of files in there
 
Quote from: WadCutter45;183199

All in all, it's been an incredible learning experience for me. Hopefully, all my efforts will result in a decent Coop map that others will want to play more than once.

yeah, where's that map? I had a dozen maps released by the time I learned all this stuff you're talking about here :idea:
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Fishmonger

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Re: GRAW Map Making for Dummies
« Reply #51 on: February 12, 2018, 02:34:32 PM »
Quote from: DeathMerc_39;185278
Hey Guys,
 
I have a 2 quick questions.... maybe they have been answered already.. go easy on me if they have.
 
Does anyone have or know where overhead shots of the original maps are available or is that a do-it-yourself-er?
 
Also; Controls in the editor.. any definitive layout of what does what or from your experiences? Help on that would be great....
 
Thanks in advance.
 
DM39 a.k.a. DChyper_39

use the bundle reader to find the TGA files that make up the minimaps for the original missions. Completely pointless if you remake them, because you have to customize the zones file anyway, redefining the game area would shift the map location and the pointers on it will be off. The minimap files are a quick export and you don't need to render lightmaps for those.
 
as for your second question - I have no idea what you want to know there. Just read the tutorial and you learn what does what. If you mean moving boxes around where you pick solders, I think click and drag is all it takes to get the menu to slide to a different corner
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Re: GRAW Map Making for Dummies
« Reply #52 on: February 12, 2018, 02:35:19 PM »
Quote from: DeathMerc_39;185887
Hey Guys,
 
I ran across a modding wikki for GRAW2 on Ghostrecon.net.
Though it is for GRAW2 there are a few useful videos covering placing, scripting etc... check it out.
 
http://graw2.pbwiki.com
 
DC_39

the one clip I looked at (bundler) was a very different process from what you do in GRAW, or I am just not doing it the same way. I suppose I could run some videos myself when I get bored and do some quick hands on tutorials. Maybe after my next big map is done, I'll do another small one like quick decision and record the processes that are hard to describe in text in some screen grab videos with voice over.
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Re: GRAW Map Making for Dummies
« Reply #53 on: February 12, 2018, 02:43:26 PM »
I started a tutorial video section for this map making stuff - first 18 segments posted today.
WMV files only (should update those as it is 2018 :D)
 
https://didnt.doit.wisc.edu/graw/tutorial/video/video_tutorials.html
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Re: GRAW Map Making for Dummies
« Reply #54 on: February 12, 2018, 02:45:07 PM »
here's something else I have been saving over the years - error messages that come up during map testing and their resolutions (the important part - saves you tons of time figuring out where to start looking for what you screwed up)
 
(this post needs an update - I have more info now in 2018)
 
 
 
this was caused by having triggers and areas defined calling for events that are not yet in the script:
 
Code: [Select]

Crash in application version: grpcrc1.35
data\lib\managers\worldmanager.dsf(-1): cant find member: _elements_vector in type <void>
SCRIPT STACK
 data\lib\managers\worldmanager.dsf(0)
 data\lib\managers\worldmanager.dsf(0)
 data\lib\managers\worldmanager.dsf(0)
 data\lib\managers\worldmanager.dsf(0)
 data\lib\setups\setup.dsf(0)
 data\levels\custom_levels\grasslands\grasslands.dsf(27)
 

this came up because there were references in triggers to areas that did not exist
 
Code: [Select]
Crash in application version: grpcrc1.35
data\lib\managers\worldmanager.dsf(-1): cant find member: add_trigger in type <void>
SCRIPT STACK
 data\lib\managers\worldmanager.dsf(0)
 data\lib\managers\worldmanager.dsf(0)
 data\lib\managers\worldmanager.dsf(0)
 data\lib\managers\worldmanager.dsf(0)
 data\lib\setups\setup.dsf(0)
 data\levels\custom_levels\tango_dont_surf\tango_dont_surf.dsf(27)
 

resason for this hud thing - I used "showmsg" element on dedicated server, which
apparently is not supported in OGR
 
Code: [Select]

Crash in application version: grpcrc1.35
data\lib\managers\eventmanager.dsf(-1): cant find member: hud in type <void>
SCRIPT STACK
 data\lib\managers\eventmanager.dsf(0)
 data\lib\managers\worldmanager.dsf(0)
 data\lib\setups\setup.dsf(0)
 data\levels\custom_levels\tango_dont_surf\tango_dont_surf.dsf(38)
 

here I didn't close a particular tag in the XML by forgetting a quote or a slash - line 2086 in the script
example:
 
 
<element type="Composition" id="F15_passover_sw start_time="5.0"/>
but it has to be
<element type="Composition" id="F15_passover_sw" start_time="5.0"/>
 
or
 
<element type="OrderTank" vehicle_id="tank1" order="set_fire_ready" value="true">
which must be
<element type="OrderTank" vehicle_id="tank1" order="set_fire_ready" value="true"/>
 
 
Code: [Select]
Wed Sep 03 11:11:58 2008
 
Crash in application version: grpcrc1.35
data\levels\custom_levels\tango_dont_surf\tango_dont_surf.xml (2086): Expected identifier
SCRIPT STACK
 data\levels\custom_levels\tango_dont_surf\tango_dont_surf.dsf(26)

here I was calling a random event with TriggerRandomEvent that wasn't in the script - left over from old map
Wed Sep 03 23:34:36 2008
 
 
Code: [Select]
Crash in application version: grpcrc1.35
data\lib\managers\actormanager.dsf(-1): cant find member: set_unit in type <void>
SCRIPT STACK
 data\lib\managers\actormanager.dsf(0)
 data\lib\managers\eventmanager.dsf(0)
 data\lib\managers\eventmanager.dsf(0)
 data\lib\managers\worldmanager.dsf(0)
 data\lib\setups\setup.dsf(0)
 data\levels\custom_levels\tango_dont_surf\tango_dont_surf.dsf(38)

reload of gauntlet map after round 1 worked- crashes all clients - reason was "ramirez" prop was used,
so never use that guy's corpse in the props list!
Sun Feb 15 19:31:11 2009
 
Code: [Select]
Crash in application version: grpcrc1.35
data\lib\script_network\gametype\gametypempcoop.dsf(-1): cant find member: base in type <void>

this happened mid map, recylcing an old script. When I hit a certain trigger, the map bomed. Repeatable. Turned out to be the
missing vehicle AI graph when it was firing a panhard event, even without the vehicle in the world file 9so a non-spawn that
usually would not crash the game)
 
Code: [Select]
data\lib\units\ai\soldier\sdriverlogics.dsf(-1): cant find member: search in type <void>
SCRIPT STACK
 data\lib\units\ai\soldier\sdriverlogics.dsf(0)
 data\lib\managers\aihivebrain.dsf(0)
 data\lib\managers\aihivebrain.dsf(0)
 data\lib\managers\aihivebrain.dsf(0)
 data\lib\managers\aihivebrain.dsf(0)
 data\lib\managers\aihivebrain.dsf(0)
 data\lib\setups\setup.dsf(0)
 data\levels\custom_levels\die_tryin\die_tryin.dsf(38)
 
Don't eat food off the sidewalk, no matter how good it looks.